University Jokes

  • Funny Jokes

    Physics Exam

    Hot 4 years ago

    The following concerns a question in a physics degree exam at the University of Copenhagen:
    "Describe how to determine the height of a skyscraper with a barometer."
    One student replied:
    "You tie a long piece of string to the neck of the barometer, then lower the barometer from the roof of the skyscraper to the ground. The length of the string plus the length of the barometer will equal the height of the building."
    This highly original answer so incensed the examiner that the student was failed immediately. He appealed on the grounds that his answer was indisputably correct, and the university appointed an independent arbiter to decide the case. The arbiter judged that the answer was indeed correct, but did not display any noticeable knowledge of physics. To resolve the problem it was decided to call the student in and allow him six minutes in which to provide a verbal answer which showed at least a minimal familiarity with the basic principles of more...

    (My cousin forwarded this to me as a true story, I hope I'm not remiss by repeating it here:)
    Two guys were taking Chemistry at the University of Alabama. They did pretty well on all of the quizzes and the midterms and labs, such that going into the final they had a solid "A". These two friends were so confident going into the final that the weekend before finals week (even though the Chemistry final was on Monday), they decided to go up to the University of Tennessee and party with some friends.
    They had a great time. However, with hangovers and everything, they overslept all day Sunday and didn't make it back to Alabama until early Monday morning.
    Rather than taking the final then, they found their professor after the final to explain to him why they missed the final. They told him that they went up to the University of Tennessee for the weekend, and had planned to come back in time to study, but that they had a flat tire on the way back, and didn't have a more...

    It's chemical

    Hot 5 years ago

    April 1, 1988: The heaviest element known to science was recently discovered
    by physicists at Turgid University. The element, tentatively named
    Administratium (Ad), has no protons or electrons, which means that its atomic
    number is 0. However, it does have 1 neutron, 125 assistants to the neutron,
    75 vice-neutrons, and 111 assistants to the vice-neutrons. This gives it an
    atomic mass number of 312. The 312 particles are held together in the nucleus
    by a force that involves the continuous exchange of meson-like particles called
    memoons.
    Since it has no electrons, Administratium is inert. However, it can be
    detected chemically because it seems to impede every reaction in which it is
    present. According to Dr. M. Langour, one of the discoverers of the element, a
    very small amount of Administratium made one reaction that normally takes less
    than a second take over four days.
    Administratium has a half-life of approximately 3 years, at more...

    More Darwin Awards!

    Hot 4 years ago

    THE DARWIN AWARDS are given every year to bestow upon (the remains of) that individual, who through single-minded self-sacrifice, has done the most to remove undesirable elements from the human gene pool.
    Runners-up: [AP, Mammoth Lakes] A San Anselmo man died yesterday when he hit a lift tower at the Mammoth Mountain ski area while riding down the slope on a foam pad, authorities said.
    Matthew David Hubal, 22, was pronounced dead at Centinela Mammoth Hospital. The accident occurred about 3 a.m., the Mono County Sheriff's Department said.
    Hubal and his friends apparently had hiked up a ski run called Stump Alley and undid some yellow foam protectors from the lift towers, said Lieutenant Mike Donnelly of the Mammoth Lakes Police Department. The pads are used to protect skiers who might hit the towers. The group apparently used the pads to slide down the ski slope and Hubal crashed into a tower. It has since been investigated that the tower he hit was the one with its pad more...

    Technology Mistakes

    Hot 3 years ago

    "Who in their right mind would ever need more than 640k of ram!?" -- Bill Gates, 1981 "Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons." -- Popular Mechanics, forecasting the relentless march of science, 1949 "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." -- Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943 "I have traveled the length and breadth of this country and talked with the best people, and I can assure you that data processing is a fad that won't last out the year." -- The editor in charge of business books for Prentice Hall, 1957 "But what. .. is it good for?" -- Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM, 1968, commenting on the microchip. "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." -- Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977 "This' telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The more...

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