Specs Jokes

  • Funny Jokes

    The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were built by English expatriates. Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.
    Why did "they" use that gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing. Okay! Why did the wagons use that odd wheel spacing? Well, if they tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on some of the old, long distance roads, because that's the spacing of the old wheel ruts.
    So who built these old rutted roads? The first long distance roads in Europe were built by Imperial Rome for the benefit of their legions. The roads have been used ever more...

    The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were built by English expatriates. Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.Why did "they" use that gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing. Okay! Why did the wagons use that odd wheel spacing? Well, if they tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on some of the old, long distance roads, because that's the spacing of the old wheel ruts.So who built these old rutted roads? The first long distance roads in Europe were built by Imperial Rome for the benefit of their legions. The roads have been used ever since. And more...

    He was in His sixth day of overtime, when an angel appeared and said... "You're doing a lot of fiddling around on this one."

    The Lord said,. .."Have you read the specs on this order?"

    She has to be;
    Completely washable,. .. but not plastic;
    Have 180 movable parts,. .. all replaceable;
    Run on black coffee and leftovers;
    Have a lap that disappears when she stands up;
    Have a kiss that can cure anything from a broken leg to a broken heart; and....
    She must have six pairs of hands.

    The angel shook her head slowly and said,. .. "Six pairs of hands?.... No way."

    "It's not the hands that are causing me problems, said the Lord... It's the three pairs of eyes that mothers have to have."

    "That's on the standard model?".... asked the angel.

    The Lord nodded... "Yes. One that sees through closed doors when she asks, What are you kids doing in there?. more...

    Dr: ur weight?
    Tom: with specs it is 75 kgs
    Dr: without specs...!
    Tom: don't know, i won't be able 2 see...

    The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8. 5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and the US railroads were built by English expatriates. Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used. Why did "they" use that gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing. Okay! Why did the wagons use that odd wheel spacing? Well, if they tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on some of the old, long distance roads, because that's the spacing of the old wheel ruts. So who built these old rutted roads? The first long distance roads in Europe were built by Imperial Rome for the benefit of their legions. The roads have been used ever since. more...

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